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Category: Non-Patent Exclusivity

Final Text of Trans-Pacific Partnership Released

At long last, the final text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a free trade agreement among a dozen Pacific Rim nations, has now been made available to the public.  The chapter on intellectual property, however, does not appear to have any material changes relating to exclusivity for new biologics from the leaked draft released by WikiLeaks last month.  Just as the provisions in the leaked draft did, Articles 18.50 and 18.52 give countries a choice between, on the one hand, at least eight years of exclusivity or, on the other hand, at least five years of exclusivity plus unspecified “other measures” and protection through “market circumstances.”  Additionally, the agreement seems to provide for only market exclusivity, not data exclusivity.  The TPP bars biosimilar applicants from entering the market during the exclusivity period, but does not appear to prevent them from accessing innovators’ regulatory data.

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TPP Biologics Exclusivity Period Maintains The Status Quo

After half a decade of negotiations, the Trans-Pacific Partnership seems to do little more than maintain the status quo for biologics.  A leaked draft of the agreement appears to require member states to provide between five and eight years of exclusivity for new biologics. But almost all TPP signatories provide that duration under current law, and some governments have already said that the pact will not require them to change their laws. The United States will be able to maintain its current twelve years of protection. Additionally, the agreement appears to provide only market exclusivity, which prevents biosimilars from being sold, and not data exclusivity, which prevents biosimilar makers from using innovators’ regulatory data. Because the TPP largely reflects existing exclusivity periods for biologics, many view it as a missed opportunity for incentivizing global investment in new biologics.

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Trans-Pacific Partnership: Compromise on Biologics Exclusivity Unclear

A final agreement has been reached on the Trans-Pacific Partnership that could provide for as little as five years of exclusivity for biologics.  The final text of the agreement is not yet officially available and its exact contours are unclear, but reports indicate that it includes a complicated compromise providing for between five and eight years of exclusivity.  This represents a setback for the United States, which sought twelve years of exclusivity throughout the negotiations.  Industry groups have also expressed disappointment.

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Biobetters: The Advantages and Challenges of Being Better

The BPCIA created an abbreviated pathway for FDA approval of biological medicinal products that are “biosimilar” to an already FDA-approved product.  The FDA recently approved the first U.S. biosimilar – Sandoz’s biosimilar of Amgen’s Neupogen – and is currently reviewing at least four other proposed biosimilars.  Many innovators and biosimilars manufacturers are responding to the changing landscape for biologics by developing “biobetters”:  new and improved versions of biologic medicinal products.  While biobetters require discovery and an original Biologics License Application (BLA) with a full complement of pre-clinical and clinical data for marketing approval, they also offer many advantages.  By offering superior and longer-acting medicine, biobetters provide a competitive advantage over biosimilar products.  In addition, unlike biosimilars, they generally would be entitled to patent protection and 12 years of non-patent exclusivity under the BPCIA.  

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Twelve Years, or Fewer? Two Current Debates on the Exclusivity Period for Biologics

The exclusivity period for biologic drugs has recently become a hot topic in both domestic and foreign policy. At home, the Obama administration’s latest budget proposes reducing the exclusivity period to seven years, down from its current 12. Abroad, the exclusivity period for biologics has developed into a sticking point in negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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Welcome to BiologicsBlog.com

Welcome to the Biologics Blog, which will track and analyze developments in intellectual property law related to biologic medical products as well as regulatory and legislative changes. Our impetus for starting the blog is the recent onset of regulatory activity and litigation under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“BPCIA”), which created a new regulatory and legal framework for biosimilar and interchangeable biologic products.

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