Categories & Search

Category: Legislation

Part I: Stakeholder Comments on FDA’s Interchangeability Guidance for Biosimilars

The comment period for FDA’s draft guidance Considerations in Demonstrating Interchangeability With a Reference Product closed on Friday, May 19, 2017.  Innovators, biosimilar makers, patients, healthcare providers and other stakeholders have weighed in on the long-awaited guidance.  Interchangeable biosimilars, unlike other biosimilars, may be substituted for the innovator product without the intervention of the healthcare provider who prescribed the innovator product.  FDA’s guidance for interchangeable biosimilars is thus particularly important to stakeholders.  This post, Part I of a three-part series, provides an overview of the key provisions of the guidance.  Parts II and III will focus on the comments from stakeholders and open issues. 

, , ,
Go

The Federal Circuit’s First Application of the AIA’s On-Sale Bar: Implications for Bio/Pharma

When a small pharmaceutical company discovers a new medicine, it’s not uncommon for the company – which may not itself have the resources or infrastructure to get that medicine to patients – to seek a distribution partner early in development.  If the partners make a deal – say the distributor pays for the right to sell the drug (if it gets approved) – and the partners publicize the existence of the deal (but not the full details of the medicine), does the deal bar a patent filed more than one year later?  In Helsinn Healthcare S.A v. Teva Pharms. USA, Inc. (May 1, 2017), a unanimous panel of the Federal Circuit ruled that the on-sale bar of the America Invents Act (AIA) precludes such a patent, just as the pre-AIA on-sale bar would.  But, in a decision with the potential to chill deals between small bio/pharma companies and potential commercialization partners, the court left unresolved some important questions about the meaning of the AIA’s on-sale bar.

, , ,
Go

100 Days Plus Under Trump: What They Mean for Biologics

President Donald J. Trump has now been in office for just over one hundred days.  Observers have been quick to mark this milestone and assess the new administration’s performance, especially on headline-grabbing issues like immigration and foreign policy. Amidst the hubbub, however, few have commented on how President Trump’s opening moves could affect the multi-billion-dollar biologics industry.  President Trump’s actions during his first hundred days on issues like trade, judges, and healthcare have the potential to shape the biologics industry for innovators and biosimilar makers alike for years to come.

, , , ,
Go

U.S. Biosimilars Pathway Under Trump

This week’s election of Donald Trump as the next President of the United States undoubtedly impacts many sectors of the American economy, and the bio/pharmaceutical industry is no exception.  Two of Trump’s stated policies might bear directly on how biologics will be protected and litigated in this country and abroad: the repeal of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), also known as Obamacare, and the repudiation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

, , ,
Go

Ten Years of Biosimilars in Europe

This fall marks the tenth anniversary of the effective date of the European Medicines Agency's Guideline on Similar Biological Medicinal Products. Over the past ten years, the EMA has approved 19 biosimilars corresponding to 6 different reference drugs, under the Guideline, and a biosimilar of a seventh is nearing final approval.  Since the EU system served as the model, in many respects, for the biosimilar approval process in the U.S. and other developed countries, the European experience sheds light on what we can expect in the development and commercializations of biosimilars in the U.S. in the next several years.

, ,
Go

Final Text of Trans-Pacific Partnership Released

At long last, the final text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a free trade agreement among a dozen Pacific Rim nations, has now been made available to the public.  The chapter on intellectual property, however, does not appear to have any material changes relating to exclusivity for new biologics from the leaked draft released by WikiLeaks last month.  Just as the provisions in the leaked draft did, Articles 18.50 and 18.52 give countries a choice between, on the one hand, at least eight years of exclusivity or, on the other hand, at least five years of exclusivity plus unspecified “other measures” and protection through “market circumstances.”  Additionally, the agreement seems to provide for only market exclusivity, not data exclusivity.  The TPP bars biosimilar applicants from entering the market during the exclusivity period, but does not appear to prevent them from accessing innovators’ regulatory data.

, , ,
Go

TPP Biologics Exclusivity Period Maintains The Status Quo

After half a decade of negotiations, the Trans-Pacific Partnership seems to do little more than maintain the status quo for biologics.  A leaked draft of the agreement appears to require member states to provide between five and eight years of exclusivity for new biologics. But almost all TPP signatories provide that duration under current law, and some governments have already said that the pact will not require them to change their laws. The United States will be able to maintain its current twelve years of protection. Additionally, the agreement appears to provide only market exclusivity, which prevents biosimilars from being sold, and not data exclusivity, which prevents biosimilar makers from using innovators’ regulatory data. Because the TPP largely reflects existing exclusivity periods for biologics, many view it as a missed opportunity for incentivizing global investment in new biologics.

, , ,
Go

Trans-Pacific Partnership: Compromise on Biologics Exclusivity Unclear

A final agreement has been reached on the Trans-Pacific Partnership that could provide for as little as five years of exclusivity for biologics.  The final text of the agreement is not yet officially available and its exact contours are unclear, but reports indicate that it includes a complicated compromise providing for between five and eight years of exclusivity.  This represents a setback for the United States, which sought twelve years of exclusivity throughout the negotiations.  Industry groups have also expressed disappointment.

, , ,
Go

The Soon-to-Be Reality of Medicare Part B Reimbursements for Biosimilars

Medicare Part B covers drugs prescribed and administered in an outpatient setting (e.g., a doctor’s office or outpatient clinic), including many biologic drugs (given that they are often injectable drugs that must be administered by a health practitioner).  In the wake of the recent approval of Sandoz’s Zarxio (filgrastim-sndz), the first FDA-approved biosimilar, the practical impact of Medicare Part B’s reimbursement policy will soon be tested in the marketplace.

, ,
Go

Twelve Years, or Fewer? Two Current Debates on the Exclusivity Period for Biologics

The exclusivity period for biologic drugs has recently become a hot topic in both domestic and foreign policy. At home, the Obama administration’s latest budget proposes reducing the exclusivity period to seven years, down from its current 12. Abroad, the exclusivity period for biologics has developed into a sticking point in negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

, , , ,
Go

Welcome to BiologicsBlog.com

Welcome to the Biologics Blog, which will track and analyze developments in intellectual property law related to biologic medical products as well as regulatory and legislative changes. Our impetus for starting the blog is the recent onset of regulatory activity and litigation under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“BPCIA”), which created a new regulatory and legal framework for biosimilar and interchangeable biologic products.

, , , , , , , ,
Go