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Category: FDA

Naming of Interchangeable and Biosimilar Biological Products Likely to Be Same

In its draft guidance, FDA proposed distinguishable nonproprietary names for biosimilars to promote the safety of patients receiving biologic medicines and minimize inadvertent substitution of biologics that have not been determined to be interchangeable.  FDA did not make a proposal for naming interchangeable biological products.  Instead, FDA requested comments on how to name such products in addition to seeking comments on its approach to naming biosimilars.  Stakeholders’ comments are now in.  Innovator companies (including those that also develop biosimilars), healthcare providers and patient advocacy groups favor distinguishable nonproprietary names for biosimilars.  Biosimilar makers, insurers, pharmacies, and the FTC, by contrast, largely fall into a different camp; they argue that distinct names are unnecessary for monitoring biosimilars and will likely bias providers against prescribing them.  Notably, the two camps came together on the naming of interchangeable products.  Since interchangeable products will likely first be approved as biosimilars, both camps advocated keeping the initial biosimilar name rather than changing it after approval as an interchangeable product.  As a result of this unified view, FDA is likely to expand the naming approach it ultimately adopts for biosimilars to interchangeable products.  

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FDA Rejects Hospira’s EPO Biosimilar Application

After the FDA approved the first U.S. biosimilar, Sandoz’s Zarxio (filgrastim-sndz), earlier this year, many predicted that the floodgates would open for biosimilar products.  That has not been the case.  No other U.S. biosimilar product has been approved.  And, as FDA’s recent rejection of Hospira’s  EPO biosimilar application suggests, Zarxio’s approval may ultimately provide little guidance for more complex products.

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Apotex Follows the BPCIA “Patent Dance” Again

The first biosimilar makers to file regulatory applications with FDA attempted to bypass all or a subset of the patent litigation provisions of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA). Apotex, the third biosimilar maker to file an application for approval of a biosimilar product with FDA, chose a different course. Apotex participated in and completed the BPCIA’s pre-suit information exchanges (also known as the “patent dance”) for its proposed biosimilar of Amgen’s Neulasta (pegfilgrastim). As Amgen’s recent lawsuit shows, Apotex followed the patent dance again for its proposed biosimilar of Amgen’s Neupogen (filgrastim).    

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FDA Accepts for Review Sandoz’s Application for a Biosimilar of Amgen’s Enbrel

Sandoz Inc. announced on October 2, 2015 that FDA accepted its regulatory application for a proposed biosimilar of Amgen Inc.’s biologic arthritis drug Enbrel for review.  The acceptance comes years after Sandoz attempted to bypass the litigation provisions of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA).  It remains to be seen whether Sandoz now will follow the BPCIA and provide its regulatory application and other manufacturing information to Amgen since the Federal Circuit has recently held that doing so is optional in Amgen v. Sandoz, another case involving the same parties and the Federal Circuit’s first decision to interpret the BPCIA.  Amgen is currently seeking en banc review of this ruling.

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Update on FDA’s Approach to Labeling Biosimilars Like Generics

The FDA approved label for the first U.S. biosimilar, Sandoz’s Zarxio, has raised concerns.  Zarxio was launched on September 3, 2015 with a label that does not state that the product was approved as a biosimilar to Amgen’s Neupogen and that it has not been determined to be interchangeable to Neupogen.  Instead, Zarxio’s label is nearly identical to that of Amgen’s Neupogen and does not identify the information provided by Sandoz to FDA to obtain Zarxio’s approval, including information on immunogenicity specific to Zarxio. AbbVie has supplemented its citizen petition urging FDA not to allow biosimilars to be labeled like generic drugs since biosimilars, unlike generic drugs, are not identical to the originator product and requesting distinct labeling for biosimilars.  In briefing U.S. senators on September 17, FDA promised to issue guidance on labeling of biosimilars.  

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Amgen Sues Hospira in Fourth Lawsuit Under the BPCIA

On September 18, 2015, Amgen sued Hospira in a fourth lawsuit under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA).  The lawsuit concerns Hospira’s proposed biosimilar of Amgen’s Epogen (epoetin alfa).  Amgen filed the case in Delaware and it has been assigned to Judge Andrews.  In addition to its claims for patent infringement, Amgen sued Hospira for failing to comply with the patent litigation provisions of the BPCIA.  Hospira’s proposed biosimilar has not been licensed by FDA.  FDA also has not announced plans for an advisory committee meeting for Hospira’s product.  

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FDA’s Proposal for Naming Biosimilars Pleases Some, Disappoints Others

The FDA has issued a long-awaited draft guidance document and proposed rule on the nonproprietary names for biosimilar medicines.  FDA proposes to give biosimilars a “core name” shared with all related biological products and a four-letter suffix, unique to each product.  The four-letter suffix, unlike the placeholder name for the first US biosimilar, Sandoz’s Zarxio (filgrastim-sndz), does not identify the product’s manufacturer.  Instead, it is a random collection of four letters, “devoid of meaning.”  Patient groups and physicians have applauded FDA’s use of unique suffixes to differentiate biological products but innovator companies prefer meaningful suffixes, such as the one for Zarxio, and biosimilar manufacturers argue for no distinguishing names at all.  

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Apotex Follows the Pre-Suit Information Exchange Provisions of the BPCIA

In the first skirmishes between biosimilar makers and innovator companies, biosimilar makers attempted to bypass the litigation provisions of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA) through the filing of declaratory judgment actions, or by not participating in all or a subset of the BPCIA’s pre-suit information exchanges (also known as the “patent dance”). Apotex, the third biosimilar maker to file an application for approval of a biosimilar product with FDA, chose a different path. As Amgen’s recent lawsuit against Apotex reveals, Apotex is the first biosimilar applicant to participate in and complete the carefully orchestrated pre-suit information exchanges of the BPCIA.

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Biosimilar Makers’ IPR Strategy Yields Mixed Results

A number of biosimilar makers have turned  to inter partes review (IPR) proceedings to challenge innovator patents prior to submitting their biosimilar applications to FDA.  IPRs have been attractive to biosimilar makers because in addition to offering procedural and substantive advantages for challenging patents they do not require the filing of a biosimilar application.  As a result, they make it possible for biosimilar makers to obtain patent certainty at a time when litigation under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA) is premature and, depending on the results of the IPRs, may be avoided entirely.  The first such IPRs, however, are yielding mixed results, leaving potential patent disputes for later BPCIA litigation.  

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First Federal Register Notice of BPCIA Suit

Today, FDA published notice of Janssen’s lawsuit against Celltrion and Hospira on March 6, 2015 under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA) in the Federal Register.  Although Janssen’s lawsuit is not the first action under the BPCIA, today marks the first time the FDA published notice of any BPCIA lawsuit.

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Biobetters: The Advantages and Challenges of Being Better

The BPCIA created an abbreviated pathway for FDA approval of biological medicinal products that are “biosimilar” to an already FDA-approved product.  The FDA recently approved the first U.S. biosimilar – Sandoz’s biosimilar of Amgen’s Neupogen – and is currently reviewing at least four other proposed biosimilars.  Many innovators and biosimilars manufacturers are responding to the changing landscape for biologics by developing “biobetters”:  new and improved versions of biologic medicinal products.  While biobetters require discovery and an original Biologics License Application (BLA) with a full complement of pre-clinical and clinical data for marketing approval, they also offer many advantages.  By offering superior and longer-acting medicine, biobetters provide a competitive advantage over biosimilar products.  In addition, unlike biosimilars, they generally would be entitled to patent protection and 12 years of non-patent exclusivity under the BPCIA.  

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FDA Approach to Labeling Treats Biosimilars Like Generics

A recent FDA guidance document eliminated biosimilar labeling information that FDA previously viewed as “necessary” for physicians to make prescribing decisions, including whether the biologic is biosimilar to or interchangeable with the reference product.  The FDA also approved a label for the first approved US biosimilar that omits this information.  The FDA’s actions have drawn criticism from associations of physicians who routinely prescribe biologic medicines and the innovator companies that develop them.

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FDA Issues Biosimilars Q&A Guidance Document

On May 13, the FDA released additional draft question-and-answer guidance on the implementation of the BPCIA.  The draft document resurrects a number of the questions from FDA’s original 2012 draft guidance that were omitted from last month’s final version of the 2012 document.  As a result, FDA’s final answers to important questions from three years ago may not be forthcoming for some time. 

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Biosimilar Makers Turn to IPRs before Litigation under the BPCIA

A number of biosimilar makers have turned to inter partes review (IPR) proceedings in order to litigate the validity of patents that cover their proposed products in advance of submitting their regulatory applications to FDA. Since IPRs, unlike district court proceedings, do not require a case or controversy, they allow biosimilar applicants to resolve potential patent disputes long prior to being able to litigate these disputes in district court and to potentially avoid the patent dispute resolution procedures of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA) of 2009 entirely.   

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The Value of Being Highly Similar: First U.S. Biosimilar

On March 6, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first biosimilar in U.S. history—Sandoz’s biosimilar of Amgen’s blockbuster drug used to prevent infections in cancer patients, Neupogen. Sandoz, a Novartis company, reaped tremendous savings in cost and time by taking advantage of the new biosimilar pathway rather than submitting a full biologics license application (BLA) to the FDA and undertaking all the studies that Amgen had to perform to obtain approval for Neupogen. The extent to which these savings will be passed on to the U.S. health care system as envisioned by the Obama administration, however, is less clear.

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FDA Denies Amgen’s Citizen’s Petition Awaiting Guidance from the Courts

On March 25, 2015, FDA denied Amgen’s Citizen Petition asking the FDA to require biosimilar applicants to certify compliance with the information disclosure provisions of the BPCIA before the FDA formally accepts the biosimilar application for review.  FDA did not decide whether the disclosure provisions were mandatory, deferring to ongoing litigation on that issue.  

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FDA Announces Approval of First Ever U.S. Biosimilar

Today the FDA announced approval of the first ever biosimilar in the United States, Sandoz’s Zarxio, a biosimilar of Amgen’s Neupogen (filgrastim) product.  Although Sandoz has cleared FDA obstacles, when Zarxio reaches the market depends on the outcome of Amgen’s lawsuit under the BPCIA. 

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Twelve Years, or Fewer? Two Current Debates on the Exclusivity Period for Biologics

The exclusivity period for biologic drugs has recently become a hot topic in both domestic and foreign policy. At home, the Obama administration’s latest budget proposes reducing the exclusivity period to seven years, down from its current 12. Abroad, the exclusivity period for biologics has developed into a sticking point in negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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Welcome to BiologicsBlog.com

Welcome to the Biologics Blog, which will track and analyze developments in intellectual property law related to biologic medical products as well as regulatory and legislative changes. Our impetus for starting the blog is the recent onset of regulatory activity and litigation under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“BPCIA”), which created a new regulatory and legal framework for biosimilar and interchangeable biologic products.

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The U.S. Biosimilar Pathway: The First Five Years and What’s Ahead

Nearly five years have passed since the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA) was signed into law.  Although the BPCIA regulatory pathway has been much slower to take shape than its European counterpart, 2015 promises to be a landmark year, with the first biosimilar in U.S. history expected to be approved next month.  

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